Volvo is launching a range of trucks that slash CO2 emissions by up to 100 per cent.

The new trucks, the Volvo FH LNG and Volvo FM LNG, can run on either biogas, which cuts CO2 by up to 100 per cent, or natural gas which reduces CO2 emissions by 20 per cent compared with diesel.

This relates to emissions from the vehicle during usage, known as tank-to-wheel.

Compared with current gas-powered trucks available on the market, Volvo Trucks’ new vehicles use 15 to 25 per cent less fuel.

In order to give the trucks the greatest possible operating range, they run on liquefied natural gas (LNG).

Our new trucks running on liquefied natural gas or biogas produce a far smaller climate footprint than diesel trucks do,” engine product manager, Mats Franzén, said.

“In addition, they are much more fuel-efficient than the gas-powered trucks available on the market today. This makes gas more viable as a replacement for diesel even for heavy long-haul operations.”  

What this means is that an operator covering 120,000km per year in heavy transport who chooses natural gas instead of diesel can cut CO2 emissions by 18 to 20 tonnes a year.

Bearing in mind that last year alone more than 264,000 heavy trucks were registered in the EU, there is immense potential for significantly reducing emissions globally from heavy commercial traffic.

There is excellent availability of natural gas, it is competitively priced in many countries, and LNG infrastructure is currently being expanded throughout Europe in accordance with the European Commission and member states’ action package for securing Europe’s long-term energy supply.

Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.