Ducati has taken the wraps off the first of five new bikes.

The Monster 821 is inspired by the famous Monster 900 which celebrates its 25th anniversary this year.

The new 821 inherits all the character and charm of the original, launched at the Cologne Show back in October, 1992.

It was this model that injected new life into the naked racer segment, by successfully combining performance, agility and rider-friendliness.

The Monster 821 adopts the design and functional features introduced with the Monster 1200: a sleek, streamlined design with completely redesigned tank and tail end – inspired by the 1992 version.

A new racing silencer and headlight, both classic and contemporary, are also part of the new design.

A colour TFT computer display also makes its debut, displaying gear position and fuel indicators.

The Ducati Quick Shift up/down and Multimedia Systems are available as accessories, to further enhance the riding experience.

The Monster returns in the Yellow colour that charmed so many fans.

Available for the 821 only, it completes the Red and assertive Matte Black colour range.

With 81kW at 9250 rpm and 86Nm of torque at 7750 rpm, the liquid-cooled twin-cylinder Testastretta offers plenty of rider-friendly thrills.

The bike also features the Ducati Safety Pack, which comprises Bosch ABS and Ducati Traction Control, both of which have adjustable intervention levels.

Riding Modes ensure easy adjustment of ABS, DTC and Power Modes (controlling peak power and type of delivery), allowing the 821 to be transformed into three different motorcycles – each with a distinct personality.

Completing the impressive equipment list are the Brembo brakes, with dual 320mm discs and M4-32 monobloc radial calipers at the front.

The suspension system includes 43mm forks at the front and an adjustable shock absorber at the rear.

The new Monster 821 is the first of Ducati’s new 2018 range, to be unveiled on line on Sunday, November 5.

Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.