Mitsubishi has reconfigured its aging but evergreen ASX small SUV yet again.

Launched way back in 2010 the ASX is Australia’s most popular small SUV and Mitsubishi is obviously loathe to kill its little cash cow, although the recently released Eclipse-Cross is very similar in size.

In its latest incarnation the diesel engine has been dropped, along with all-wheel drive, both of which were too expensive.

A 2.0-litre four cylinder petrol engine now standard across a range that has been culled to three specification levels — ES, LS and Exceed.

Prices for the ES start from $23,490 plus on-roads for the five speed manual, or $25,490 with a CVT style auto.

Safety costs and for $1500 more you can add the Advanced Driver Assist Systems (ADAS) safety pack that includes Blind Spot Warning (BSW), Lane Change Assist (LCA), Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), Lane Departure Warning (LDW) and Forward Collision Mitigation (FCM). It also adds reverse sensors, dusk sensing headlights and rain sensing wipers.

Moving up the range, the LS features smart key with one-touch start, FCM and LDW along with auto high beam and privacy glass.  

Exterior stying is enhanced with two-tone 18-inch alloys while the interior boasts microsuede seats and leather-look bolsters.

ASX Exceed is fitted with BSW, LCA and RCTA in addition to key features including panoramic glass roof with LED mood lighting, leather seat facings and heated front seats.

Mitsubishi boss John Signoriello said ASX is the cornerstone of Mitsubishi’s SUV line-up and leads the market in its combination of stylish looks, outstanding value and compact SUV practicality.

“ASX is a perennial favourite with SUV shoppers so we’ve taken the time to introduce meaningful improvements without altering ASX’s winning formula,” he said.

CHECKOUT: ASX starting to show its age

CHECKOUT: Will Eclipse Cross out ASX?

Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.