Overseas Volkswagen’s hi-tech virtual cockpit technology is coming to the Skoda range.

Australia is sure to follow suit shortly.

The new, fully programmable digital instrument panel will be available to the Karoq, Octavia, Superb and Kodiaq models.

Customers will have the option of replacing traditional analogue dials and gauges with a high-definition electronic display for the first time.

The Virtual Cockpit advanced display technology has, until now, been reserved for the group’s luxury models.

It will initially be offered as an option on Karoq, Octavia and Superb models, with the Kodiaq set to follow later this year.

In simple terms, Virtual Cockpit is an advanced digital display that takes the place of traditional dials, gauges and sub-screens.

At the heart of the system is a super sharp TFT display that has been specifically designed for for 3D graphics and exceptional clarity.

A quadcore Nvidia Tegra 30 chip enables the content to be displayed quickly and vibrantly, improving the way drivers interact with both their car and the road.

The digital display allows drivers can customise the layout of the screen to suit their tastes.

In total, five different basic layouts are available, all of which can be individually programmed to fine-tune their appearance.

The classic layout presents both the tachometer and the speedometer as round instruments to the right and left of the display.

The area between can be configured – for example with a display of the current entertainment program or navigation map, which also has a zoom function.

The extended layout has a main display covering the entire width of the panel – for example with the current entertainment program or navigation map.

Above and below, there is still space for small digital displays, for instance, for the current speed, gear recommendation, traffic sign recognition, distance remaining, distance to the next turn on the programmed route or the distance remaining to the destination.

The modern layout has a large display in the centre, which can display the navigation map, among other things.

Additional information can be placed to the left, right, and above the map.

The driver may choose to display the current speed, navigation display with pictograms, gear selection, traffic sign detection (e.g. speed limits, driving times).

The basic layout shows two large displays – such as the current speed and the distance remaining.

Additional basic information can be displayed at the top and bottom of the display.

If the route guidance is activated, the navigation arrow will be displayed in the centre.

The sports layout shows a single, centralised, large dial containing the speedometer and rev counter, with space for additional customisable information to be placed at either side of the dial.

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Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.