Aston Martin has dome some crystal ball gazing and come up with a way to covert classic cars to run on electricity.

The idea is to future proof them in case Governments legislate to ban the use of petrol engines in the years to come.

Part of the company’s EV strategy, the Heritage electrification concept has been developed around a “cassette” style EV powertrain.

The first car to receive the radical new transplant is an original 1970 DB6 MkII Volante, that would have been originally hand-crafted at Newport Pagnell.

Sitting on the original engine and gearbox mountings, the cassette is fully enclosed within its own self-contained cell, apart from umbilical cords from the power unit to feed the car’s electrical systems.

Power management is operated via a dedicated screen, which is discreetly fitted to the car’s interior.

Given the historical significance of these collectors cars, Aston Martin says it’s vital any EV conversion is sympathetic to the integrity of the original car.

The cassette system offers the perfect solution, offering owners the reassurance of knowing their car is future-proofed and socially responsible — yet still an authentic Aston Martin with the ability to reinstate its original powertrain if necessary.

Aston Martin Lagonda boss Andy Palmer said the company was very aware of the environmental and social pressures that threaten to restrict the use of classic cars in the years to come.

“Our Second Century Plan not only encompasses our new and future models, but also protects our treasured heritage. I believe this not only makes Aston Martin unique, but a truly forward-thinking leader in this field,” he said.

Having handled the initial concept evaluation and proof-of-concept DB6 Volante, Aston Martin Works will also be responsible for completing customer Heritage EV conversions, which are expected to start in 2019.

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Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.