ALFA Romeo and Jeep are words hardly ever appearing in the same sentence, but news from Italia is that Alfa is planning another entry into the burgeoning SUV market with a smaller model, to be positioned below its illustrious Stelvio.

It has now emerged, however, that the compact crossover is not going to be a scaled-down  Stelvio, but one based on the Jeep Compass.

Production will take place at Fiat-Chrysler’s Pomigliano plant.

Automotive News Europe says it forms part of FCA’s plan of moving production of lower-profit Fiat cars out of Italy and higher-margin models in.

But will the compact crossover still drive like an Alfa?

After all, Jeeps are not known as great roadholders among the pasta fraternity.

The Stelvio proved a pleasant surprise with its well-honed chassis and steering making it one of the better-driving crossovers out there, but then it is based on the Giulia’s rear-wheel-drive architecture.

Although it remains to be seen just how closely the as-yet-unnamed compact would be based on the Compass, it’s certainly not going to match its bigger brother for fleet-footedness unless Alfa’s whitecoats pull some miracle engineering out the bag.

And what about the rest of the small Alfa line-up?

According to the legendary brand’s 2018 to 2022 product plan that was revealed in June this year, the ill-fated Mito is falling away, while the Giulietta will get a long-overdue mid-life facelift.

The Stelvio and Giulia will also get a nip and tuck between now and 2022.

There is more exciting news on the horizon though, as Alfa Romeo plans to revive the GTV (as a Giulia-based two-door) and launch a new version of the 8C.

CHECKOUT: Giulia goes like shot of espresso

CHECKOUT: Sadly, Crawf’s Italian fling ended badly

Buys

Bill Buys, probably Australia’s longest-serving motoring writer, has been at his craft for more than five decades. Athough motoring has always been in his DNA, he was also night crime reporter, foreign page editor and later chief reporter of the famed Rand Daily Mail. He’s twice been shot at, attacked by a rhinoceros and had several chilling experiences in aircraft. His experience includes stints in traffic law enforcement, motor racing and rallying and writing for a variety of local and international publications. He has covered countless events, ranging from world motor shows and Formula 1 Grands Prix to Targa tarmac and round-the-houses meetings. A motoring tragic, he has owned more than 90 cars. Somewhat of a nostalgic, he has a special interest in classic cars. He is the father of Targa star Robert Buys, who often adds his expertise to Bill’s reviews.