Going camping usually means going off the grid with a range of LPG powered appliances to provide your lighting and heating needs.

But Nissan has come up with a novel way to power up your weekend in the bush, with a smart camping concept that uses recycled electric vehicle batteries to deliver up to a week’s worth of remote power.

The Nissan x OPUS concept integrates the recently unveiled Nissan Energy ROAM, a portable, all-in-one, weatherproof power pack harnessing Nissan’s EV battery technology for convenient, emission-free and silent power on the go.

With a storage capacity of 700Wh and a power output of 1kW, the ROAM’s lithium-ion cells are recovered from first-generation Nissan electric vehicles, ensuring a sustainable second-life for the batteries.

Mounted in a special compartment at the front of the OPUS, the Nissan Energy ROAM unit provides a power supply to both the 230v circuit and the 12v circuit (via recharging of the on-board leisure battery which powers the 12v system).

This helps support enough energy autonomy for around seven days of camping, with assistance from a solar panel accessory.

The concept allows campers to remain connected and enjoy the comforts of home, whilst having the freedom to travel to remote areas.

Uniquely, Nissan Energy ROAM can be removed from its housing within the camper and recharged away from the campsite via a standard 230v domestic socket, or by plugging into a solar panel accessory.

The Nissan x OPUS concept will makes its public debut on the OPUS stand at the Caravan, Camping and Motorhome Show at The NEC, Birmingham.

The downside? They’re not cheap from £15,995 — about $29,800 Aussie dollars.

CHECKOUT: Meet the ultimate off road campervan

CHECKOUT: Learn how to get off (road)

Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.