EVER hopped into an Uber, arrived at your destination and a few minutes later realised you’d left something behind?

It can happen to any of us.  

And while Uber is pretty big in Australia, it’s about 100 times bigger in the US and some of its users — they must run into millions — inevitably leave behind their mobile phones, wallets, keys, and, on one occasion — a puppy.

What?

Uber has just released its latest lost and found index to show the most common, and some of the most bizarre, items customers have left behind in one of its ride-sharing vehicles.

The most commonly forgotten items are self-explanatory: numero uno was mobile phones, followed by cameras, wallets, keys, purses and backpacks.

Also frequently forgotten were e-cigarettes, identification cards, headphones and reading and sunglasses.

From there on, it gets mighty weird.

Uber named the top 50 strangest items riders left behind in 2018, and it starts with an 8-week-old coffee-coloured Chihuahua puppy. (Uber didn’t say if it was latte, flat white, macchiato or exactly what shade).

Some of the other highlights from the list include a full set of gold teeth, a salmon head, a propane tank, a Lego championship wrestling belt, a black and white tuxedo for a small dog,  two packs of Italian sausage plus a Thanksgiving day ham.

Want more?

What about a shopping cart (which must have been in an Uber XL?), a bird, a fish tank complete with water and live fish, deer antlers, and a welding helmet.

Then, unsurprisingly, there was a medium-sized medical marijuana pipe, not to mention a Star Wars skateboard, a pair of white leather snakeskin Louboutin heels, an Ed Sheeran concert tank top, a Babe Ruth-signed baseball, a Harry Potter Magic Wand, a mannequin, a fog machine, a Japanese mandolin, a jewelled Elvis cape, one Gucci flip flop and somebody’s party fare: 4.5kg of pulled pork and another 4.5kg of pulled chicken.

Uber also broke down the ‘lost and found’ index to include the more forgetful cities, days of the week when riders were most likely to forget something, and specific time periods.

So it’s no surprise that Saturdays and Sundays are the most likely times for riders to forget something, and from 10pm to 1am are peak forgetful hours.

The most forgetful cities? East Alabama and Gallup, in New Mexico, Cookeville, Tennessee, the Mississippi Delta, Boone, North Carolina, Sioux City, Iowa, South Georgia, Mankato, Minnesota, College Station, Texas and Tallahassee, Florida.

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Buys

Bill Buys, probably Australia’s longest-serving motoring writer, has been at his craft for more than five decades. Athough motoring has always been in his DNA, he was also night crime reporter, foreign page editor and later chief reporter of the famed Rand Daily Mail. He’s twice been shot at, attacked by a rhinoceros and had several chilling experiences in aircraft. His experience includes stints in traffic law enforcement, motor racing and rallying and writing for a variety of local and international publications. He has covered countless events, ranging from world motor shows and Formula 1 Grands Prix to Targa tarmac and round-the-houses meetings. A motoring tragic, he has owned more than 90 cars. Somewhat of a nostalgic, he has a special interest in classic cars. He is the father of Targa star Robert Buys, who often adds his expertise to Bill’s reviews.