The new Genesis G70 sports sedan has all the makings of a game changer for the luxury brand.

A competitor for the Audi A4, BMW 3 Series and Mercedes-Benz C-Class, the sleek, new sporty addition to the local Genesis lineup goes on sale tomorrow, with the opening of the company’s first “studio” in the Sydney CBD.

Other competitors include the Japanese brands Lexus and Infiniti, and Infiniti’s similar naming structure could lead to some confusion in the marketplace.

There’s a new G80 too, but we’ll leave the big sedan for the hire car guys.

Priced from $59,300, the new G70 will be offered with a choice of two powertrains, with three model grades from which to chose.

Kicking things off is the G70 2.0T, with a 2.0-litre turbocharged four that produces 179kW and a potent 353Nm.

Then there’s the 3.3T with a 3.3-litre twin turbo six cylinder engine that develops 272kW and 510Nm.

Both engines are hooked up to a a lightweight, aluminium, in-house developed 8-speed auto that delivers power to the rear wheels.

If any of this sounds familiar, that’s because it is. These are the same combos that drive Kia’s killer Stinger sports sedan.

And — surprise, surprise — the two cars share the same platform.

What’s Genesis got that Kia doesn’t?

Well, a bigger price tag for one — but remember Genesis is a luxury brand and the G70 is equipped in kind.

The entry G70 2.0T comes with seven airbags and Genesis Active Safety Control suite that includes Blind-Spot Warning, Driver Attention Warning, Forward Collision-Avoidance Assist with pedestrian detection and lane-change oncoming function, and High Beam Assist systems.

There’s also Lane Keeping Assist with line/road-edge functions, a Rear Cross-Traffic Collision Warning system and Smart Cruise Control with Stop & Go, as well as a Surround View Monitor (Ultimate models only), Forward/Reverse Parking Distance Warning, a Rear View Monitor with parking guidance, and a Tyre Pressure Monitoring System.

The equipment list is similarly generous, with Genesis Connected Services, a Smart Boot with hands-free opening, 7.0-inch instrument display, 12-way powered and heated front seats, tyre pressure monitoring, 8.0-inch multimedia unit featuring satellite navigation, DAB+ digital radio and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, dual-zone climate control, and wireless (Qi standard) phone charging.

Sport versions add Brembo brakes, 19-inch alloys wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sport 4 high-performance tyres, a mechanical limited-slip rear diff, sports body and interior styling elements, plus sports instrumentation.

While the 3.3T variants boast Genesis Adaptive Control Suspension (GACS), Variable Gear Ratio (VGR) steering rack, and Dynamic Torque Vectoring Control (DTVC).

At the top of the tree Ultimate versions feature with Nappa leather, ventilated front seats with a 16-way driver’s seat adjustment, driver position memory, heated outboard rear seats, heated steering wheel and power-adjust steering column.

There’s also Head-Up Display, a Surround View Monitor, an Adaptive Front-Lighting System, 15-speaker Lexicon by Harman premium audio, and a Panorama Sunroof.

Part of the pitch is also the stress-free purchase and ownership experience which includes:

  • Test-drive home-delivery service
  • Industry-first online build and order with haggle-free, fixed pricing
  • Concierge pick-up and delivery for scheduled servicing, with complimentary
    courtesy car
  • Convenient handover delivery service for new purchases
  • And an expanding network of Genesis Studios, that deliver a premium customer
    experience

In addition, the cars come with a 5-year/unlimited kilometre warranty, 5-year/50,000km complimentary scheduled servicing, 5-year 24/7 roadside assist, 5-year map updates and 5-year subscription to Genesis Connected Services and the exclusive ‘Genesis To You’ valet service.

 

CHECKOUT: Kia Stinger: what’s it really like?

CHECKOUT: Genesis: go big or go home

Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.