In the United States Roush Performance reckons it’s produced the fastest production ute on the face of the planet.

We’re talking about the 2019 Roush-enhanced Nitemare F-150 4×4.

Two configurations of the “truck” were tested by a team of automotive industry experts including Jack Roush Jr., Roush-sponsored professional drifter Justin Pawlak, automotive personality Aaron Kaufman, racer and journalist Robb Holland, and a team of Roush Performance engineers.

The trucks were run on a prepared drag strip in Sport mode with rear differentials locked (both of which are standard user-selectable settings), a light fuel load, and the standard Continental tyres that come factory-equipped on all Roush vehicles inflated to 32 pounds per square inch.

The 0-60 mph times were measured using a VBOX DriftBox, which rounds to the nearest tenth of a second with a +/- one percent margin of error.

The production Nitemare 4X4 SuperCrew pickup hit 60 miles per hour in a record-setting 4.1 seconds.

An engineering test truck equivalent to a production Nitemare 4X4 Regular Cab pickup broke the elusive 4.0 second mark, hitting 60 miles per hour in a record-setting 3.9 seconds.

“It’s one thing to just add raw power to a vehicle, it’s another to truly engineer it,” Jack Roush Jr said.

“With 650 horsepower, the Nitemare delivers power unlike any other truck while retaining the reliability and refined feel you’d expect from any ROUSH vehicle,” he said.

Based in Plymouth, Michigan, Roush Performance designs, engineers and manufactures completely assembled pre-titled vehicles, aftermarket performance parts, and superchargers for the global performance enthusiast market.

Of course this is only possible with the demise of our domestic Ford and Holden performance utes . . . wouldn’t you agree?

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Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.