Nissan has just taken the wraps off a new Patrol, but is anyone really interested?

Is the Patrol still relevant as we speed towards an electrified future and the need for vehicles like this evaporates?

The company sold just 922 of the hulking, V8-powered off-road monoliths here last year, priced from $80,000, and although sales are up 47 per cent year on year — it still represents just 1356 vehicles so far in total.

The main problem for Nissan’s off road standard bearer is that it is not available with a diesel engine and hasn’t been since the launch of the current model in 2013.

The massive 5.6-litre petrol V8 that powers the Patrol sucks fuel at the prodigious rate of 14.4L/100km, and that’s under controlled conditions — imagine what it returns in real life.

New Patrol features Nissan’s V-motion grille, interpreted in what Nissan describes as a new way for SUVs.

Along with the new boomerang-shaped LED headlights, the redesigned grille highlights Patrol’s strong, angular front.

At the rear, Patrol’s new tail lights also sport the boomerang shape.

They are seamlessly integrated along with a large chrome nameplate and sequential rear turn indicators, which have been added for the first time on a Nissan vehicle.

Inside, a new centre console incorporates dual displays featuring Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

BUT power still comes from the same 5.6-litre V8, although this time around there’s the option of a 4.0-litre petrol V6 — at least overseas.

Patrol has just one competitor in the segment of the market in which it competes, the Toyota Land Cruiser.

And the Cruiser does come with a diesel and one that delivers a respectable 9.5L/100km.

Even the bloody Lexus version of the car, the LX, now comes with a diesel.

Granted Patrol is a force to be reckoned with off road, but few owners ever get these overgrown people movers dirty.

Here at Cars4starters, we reckon it’s time for a reality check!

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Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.