In a blast from the past Aussie sportscar maker Bolwell will preview a brand new, mid-engined, V8 supercar at Motorclassica in Melbourne next week.

It’s 50 years since Bolwell delivered its iconic Mk VIII Nagari, powered by a Ford 302 or 351 V8 — which was built from 1970 to 1974.

The Toyota-powered, supercharged Mk X or Nagari 300 appeared in 2008..

The new Bolwell Nagari 500 Preview packs 372kW into a lightweight, advanced composite body that weighs less than 1000kg.

The result is promised to be a ball-tearer, with the dash from 0-100 km/h taking less than 3 seconds, and a top speed that is expected to exceed 300km/h.

Powered by a Chevy LS3 V8, it’s a return to Nagari’s V8 roots for Bolwell Technologies founder Campbell Bolwell.

“We’ve had it out for a few drives, and it’s a real supercar,” he said.

“As with the original Nagari, this is a proper road car. It’s hugely powerful, but you can drive it to the shops. It even has a boot.”

Campbell Bolwell has created the new car with brother Graeme and long-term Bolwell team member Ross McConnell, who developed the first Nagari, and Nagari 300 development engineer Toby Hunt.

The headline act is the super-light, super-strong body and Occupant Safety Capsule, made of carbon-kevlar composite, using Bolwell’s own closed moulding vacuum infusion system for unbeatable strength-to-weight.

Suspension is classic dual wishbones with pneumatically adjustable adaptive dampers, brakes are 355mm ventilated and cross-drilled discs.

Tyres are 265/35ZR19 on 19×10.5 inch alloys up front with 305/30ZR19 on massive 19×12 inch rear rims.

CHECKOUT: Not one, but three Eurekas!

CHECKOUT: Ambitious Europa a dream machine for the masses

Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.