Jeep has joined forces with Humvee’s AM General to produce a new, light tactical military concept vehicle.

The Jeep Gladiator Extreme Military-Grade Truck (XMT) by AM General is the first phase of a collaboration that reunites two companies whose history stretches back to World War II.

In creating the XMT, AM General has leveraged Gladiator’s class-leading capabilities and customised the truck to meet global needs for a light-weight military truck.

It was AM General that produced the original Humvee for US military forces.

GM later purchased the name and started to produced civilian versions called the Hummer — H1 (based on the Humvee, and the H2 and H3.

But the vehicles proved to be unprofitable and the last H3 was produced in 2010.

In 2015, AM General lost its bid to build the Humvee’s replacement for the US military to Oshkosh Corporation which produces the completely new Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV).

AM General identified the all-new 2020 Jeep Gladiator as the ideal platform on which to develop the Extreme Military-Grade concept vehicle, with 3500kg tow capacity and up to 725kg payload capacity.

“The Jeep brand has an important military heritage, so we couldn’t be happier that AM General expressed interest in creating the Gladiator XMT,” Head of Jeep Brand – North America, Jim Morrison, said.

“The all-new Jeep Gladiator boasts unmatched functionality, versatility and especially capability, including two advanced 4×4 systems, locking differentials, skid plates, tow hooks, and incredible approach, break-over and departure angles – the perfect foundation for this ultra-capable military concept vehicle.

“We’re proud to partner with AM General, we look forward to gauging interest and gathering feedback on the Jeep Gladiator XMT, and we’re excited about potential future opportunities,” he added.

Based on its more than 100 years of experience in the defense industry and deep knowledge of the global military landscape, AM General identified a series of parts and accessories that amplify the Jeep Gladiator’s leading off-road manoeuvrability and enhance the Gladiator’s capability to provide its end users with the appropriate equipment for tactical communications and service.

The Jeep Gladiator XMT has been fitted with both custom-built and commercially available military-grade parts to create an even more rugged truck that can traverse the toughest of terrains in adverse conditions and is ready to meet varied military customer requirements.

As with the iconic, proven and versatile Humvee, AM General can also apply its manufacturing and engineering expertise to convert the Gladiator XMT into mission-specific and purposeful light-weight tactical trucks based on customer requirements.

Whether the need is to have a rugged personnel transport carrier or a command and control truck, the company has demonstrated through the Enhanced Tactical Kit (ETK) offerings on Humvee, its ability to deliver solutions that are customer-driven and cost-effective.

Pending feedback and interest in the military marketplace, production could begin in the second half of 2020.

In addition to the petrol model, Gladiator XMT would be offered to military customers as a diesel version.

All Gladiator models are Trail Rated with a badge indicating that the vehicle is designed to perform in a variety of challenging off-road conditions identified by five key consumer-oriented performance categories: traction, ground clearance, manoeuvrability, articulation and water fording.

Gladiator Rubicon models are equipped with signature red tow hooks, Rock-Trac 4×4 system, featuring a two-speed transfer case with a 4:1 low-range gear ratio, front and rear heavy-duty Dana 44 axles, Tru-Lok electric front- and rear-axle lockers, segment-exclusive electronic sway bar disconnect, cab and bed rock rails and standard 33-inch Falken Wildpeak All-Terrain off-road tyres.

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Riley

Chris Riley has been a journalist for almost 40 years. He has spent half of his career as a writer, editor and production editor in newspapers, the rest of the time driving and writing about cars both in print and online. His love affair with cars began as a teenager with the purchase of an old VW Beetle, followed by another Beetle and a string of other cars on which he has wasted too much time and money. A self-confessed geek, he’s not afraid to ask the hard questions - at the risk of sounding silly.